John Ruskin, (born February 8, 1819, London, England—died January 20, 1900, Coniston, Lancashire), English critic of art, architecture, and society who was a gifted painter, a distinctive prose stylist, and an important example of the Victorian Sage, or Prophet: a writer of polemical prose who seeks to cause widespread cultural and social change. The young Ruskin spent his summers in the Scottish countryside and when he was four, the family moved to south London's Herne Hill, a rural area at the time. Working in the tradition of the Romantic poetic prose of Charles Lamb and Thomas De Quincey, though more immediately influenced by the descriptive writing of Sir Walter Scott, the rhetoric of the Bible, and the blank verse of William Wordsworth, Ruskin vividly evoked the effect on the human eye and sensibility both of Turner’s paintings and of the actual landscapes that Turner and other artists had sought to represent. Ruskin’s father, an Art Enthusiast would collec… John Ruskin was born on 8 February 1819 in London, England, to John James Ruskin, a prosperous businessman, and his wife, Margaret Cox, as their only child. John Ruskin is England's greatest writer on European visual arts and architecture. Fellow and Tutor in English Literature, Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford. After five years at the University of Oxford, during which he won the Newdigate Prize for poetry but was prevented by ill health from sitting for an honours degree, Ruskin returned, in 1842, to his abandoned project of defending and explaining the late work of Turner. Please select which sections you would like to print: Corrections? In his formative years, painters such as J.M.W. Get a Britannica Premium subscription and gain access to exclusive content. Omissions? “ The Ruskin Family Letters: The Correspondence of John James Ruskin, His Wife, and Their Son, John, 1801-1843 [hardcover] Ruskin, John [Jun 01, 1973]…2 volume set ” Red slipcase, volume 1 and volume 2 as new condition inside and out, clean crisp and unmarked etc . Previously cities included Wimauma FL, New Milford CT and Danbury CT. Other names that Antonio uses includes Antonio V Martinez. A young John Ruskin by Thomas Richmond II. An only child, Ruskin was born in 1819 in south London to affluent parents, John James Ruskin, a Scottish wine merchant, and Margaret Ruskin, the daughter of a pub proprietor. Ring in the new year with a Britannica Membership, https://www.britannica.com/biography/John-Ruskin, Art Encyclopedia - Biography of John Ruskin, Ashmolean - The Elements of Drawing: John Ruskin’s Teaching Collection at Oxford, John Ruskin - Student Encyclopedia (Ages 11 and up). As he did so, he alerted readers to the fact that they had, in Turner, one of the greatest painters in the history of Western art alive and working among them in contemporary London, and, in the broader school of English landscape painting, a major modern art movement. Shortly after his return from Switzerland in early October of 1859, Ruskin left London for Cheshire. Their son, John James Ruskin (born May 10, 1785), was sent to the famous High School of Edinburgh, under Dr. Adam, the most renowned of Scottish head-masters, and there he received the sound old-fashioned classical education. Ruskin was born into the commercial classes of the prosperous and powerful Britain of the years immediately following the Napoleonic Wars. Instead, he defined painting as “a noble and expressive language, invaluable as the vehicle of thought, but by itself nothing.” What that language expressed, in Romantic landscape painting, was a Wordsworthian sense of a divine presence in Nature: a morally instructive natural theology in which God spoke through physical “types.” Conscious of the spiritual significance of the natural world, young painters should “go to Nature in all singleness of heart…having no other thoughts but how best to penetrate her meaning, and remember her instruction; rejecting nothing, selecting nothing, and scorning nothing.”. He is a social critic of seminal importance … His father, John James Ruskin, was a Scots wine merchant who had moved to London and made a fortune in the sherry trade. Let us know if you have suggestions to improve this article (requires login). Before he was sixteen, his sister Jessie was already married at Perth Ruskin studied at Oxf… His father, John James, was a successful wine merchant who was fond of Romantic writers, especially Lord Byron and Sir Walter Scott. This shift of concern from general to particular conceptions of truth was a key feature of Romantic thought, and Ruskin’s first major achievement was thus to bring the assumptions of Romanticism to the practice of art criticism. Ruskin’s family background in the world of business was significant, too: it not only provided the means for his extensive travels to see paintings, buildings, and landscapes in Britain and continental Europe but also gave him an understanding of the newly rich, middle-class audience for which his books would be written. He was given his education at home until the age of 12. His parents, John James and Margaret Ruskin, were first cousins, his father a Scottish wine merchant, his mother a particularly devout Protestant. Ruskin was born on February 8, 1819, to first cousins, John James Ruskin and Margaret Cox. John Ruskin (8 February 1819 - 20 January 1900) was an English art, social, and literary critic, and sometime poet. In these years famous painters such as JMW Turner, John Constable, and John Cotman were at the making the careers. As he did so, he alerted readers to the fact that they had, in Turner, one of the greatest painters in the history of Western art alive and working among them in contemporary London, and, in the broader school of English landscape painting, a major modern art movement. Ruskin was born into the commercial classes of the prosperous and powerful Britain of the years immediately following the Napoleonic Wars. He was educated at home, where h… Ruskin was born into the commercial classes of the prosperous and powerful Britain of the years immediately following the Napoleonic Wars. Like so many other scourges of the bourgeoisie, Ruskin grew up in a bourgeois family. Editor of. One after another, Turner’s “truth of tone,” “truth of colour,” “truth of space,” “truth of skies,” “truth of earth,” “truth of water,” and “truth of vegetation” were minutely considered, in a laborious project that would not be completed until the appearance of the fifth and final volume of Modern Painters in 1860. In the process Ruskin introduced the newly wealthy commercial and professional classes of the English-speaking world to the possibility of enjoying and collecting art. By the mid-1830s he was publishing short pieces in both prose and verse in magazines, and in 1836 he was provoked into drafting a reply (unpublished) to an attack on Turner’s painting by the art critic of Blackwood’s Magazine. ISBN 0801407257 Ruskin’s family background in the world of business was significant, too: it not only provided the means for his extensive travels to see paintings, buildings, and landscapes in Britain and continental Europe but also gave him an understanding of the newly rich, middle-class audience for which his books would be written. John James Ruskin (1785-1864) was the father of John Ruskin and son of John Thomas Ruskin, and Catherine Tweddale. At the same time religious writers and preachers such as Charles Simeon, John Keble, Thomas Arnold, and John Henry Newman were establishing the spiritual and ethical preoccupations that would characterize the reign of Queen Victoria. His father, John Thomas Ruskin, described as a grocer (but apparently an ambitious wholesale merchant), was an incompetent businessman. Drawing on his serious amateur interests in geology, botany, and meteorology, Ruskin made it his business to demonstrate in detail that Turner’s work was everywhere based on a profound knowledge of the local and particular truths of natural form. He was the only child of John James Ruskin and Margaret Cox. Ruskin discovered the work of Turner through the illustrations to an edition of Samuel Rogers’s poem Italy given him by a business partner of his father in 1833. In his formative years, painters such as J.M.W. Drawing on his serious amateur interests in geology, botany, and meteorology, Ruskin made it his business to demonstrate in detail that Turner’s work was everywhere based on a profound knowledge of the local and particular truths of natural form. In these circumstances the critic was obliged to create in words an effective sensory and emotional substitute for visual experience. By signing up for this email, you are agreeing to news, offers, and information from Encyclopaedia Britannica. His father, a prosperous, self-made man who was a founding partner of Pedro Domecq sherries, collected art and encouraged his son's literary activities, while his mother, a devout evangelical Protestant, early dedicated her son to the service of God and devoutly wished him to beco Ruskinobtained his early education fr… Ruskin’s father was also interested in art and majored in art collection as his business. John Ruskin was born February 8, 1819, in London, a few months before Queen Victoria’s birth. John Ruskin, the only child of John James Ruskin (1785–1864), a sherry importer, and Margaret Cock (1781–1871), was born on 8th February 1819, at 54 Hunter Street, Brunswick Square, London. Antonio maintains relationships with many people -- family, friends, associates, & neighbors -- including Jeffrey Martinez, John James Martinez, Janae Morales, Jesse Martinez and Candace … This gave him an opportunity to have a peek at the newly forming high classes and middle classes of the society. By signing up for this email, you are agreeing to news, offers, and information from Encyclopaedia Britannica. John Ruskin was the leading English art critic of the Victorian era, as well as an art patron, draughtsman, watercolourist, philosopher, prominent social thinker and philanthropist. RUSKIN, JOHN (1819–1900), author, artist, and social reformer, was the only child of John James Ruskin (b. In 1843 Ruskin published the first volume of Modern Painters, a book that would eventually consist of five volumes and occupy him for the next 17 years. The 200th anniversary of birth of John Ruskin, the iconic 19th century thinker and artist, will be celebrated with various exhibitions and lectures in the UK. The two women grew close and soon fastened on a common object of love and concern, John James. John Ruskin was born on 8 February 1819 at 54 Hunter Street, London, the only child of Margaret and John James Ruskin. The cousins met when Margaret traveled to Edinburgh to serve as helper and companion to her aunt, John James's mother. On February 8th. He, therefore, had a significant influence on Ruskin’s art career. Three years later, in the second volume of Modern Painters (1846), Ruskin would specifically distinguish this strenuously ethical or Theoretic conception of art from the Aesthetic, undidactic, or art-for-art’s-sake definition that would be its great rival in the second half of the 19th century. John Ruskin (1819-1900) On February 8, 1819, prominent social thinker and philanthropist John James Ruskin was born. John James Ruskin was the son of an Edinburgh calico merchant. Despite his friendships with individual Aesthetes, Ruskin would remain the dominant spokesman for a morally and socially committed conception of art throughout his lifetime. By 1843 avant-garde painters had been working in this new spirit for several decades, but criticism and public understanding had lagged behind. Ruskin discovered the work of Turner through the illustrations to an edition of Samuel Rogers’s poem Italy given him by a business partner of his father in 1833. John James was born and brought up in Edinburgh, Scotland, to a mother from Glenluce and a father originally from Hertfordshire. His childhood saw a contrasting influence from both parents who had fierce ambitions for him. See more ideas about john ruskin, ruskin, english art. His wife, Margaret Cock (1781–1871), was the daughter of a publican in Croydon. Ruskin was the only child of first cousins. John James Ruskin had much experience of his son's sudden enthusiasms. Jan 8, 2015 - Explore Shaun Curran's board "John Ruskin - Artist, Critic", followed by 150 people on Pinterest. Summary: Antonio Villodas's birthday is 07/27/1968 and is 52 years old. She had joined the Ruskin household when she became companion to John Jame… John James Ruskin disliked the necessary travelling in search of clients which separated him from his wife and child; as the sherry business prospered he was able to make the summer tour with his family less and less of a business trip and more and more of a holiday. Be on the lookout for your Britannica newsletter to get trusted stories delivered right to your inbox. In 1818, he married his cousin Margaret, the daughter of a skipper in the herring fleet. His mother, Margaret, was a rigorous evangelical who insisted on his memorizing large parts of the Bible. In 1843 Ruskin published the first volume of Modern Painters, a book that would eventually consist of five volumes and occupy him for the next 17 years. The grave of John James Ruskin in the churchyard of St John the Evangelist, Shirley, Croydon Ruskin as a young child, painted by James Northcote . Ithaca, NY; London: Cornell University Press, 1973. John James Ruskin was the son of a small tradesman, and Margaret Ruskin's family ran a pub. He remained at Winnington until 10 November. Sketch of Euphemia Gray, c.1854 by John Everett Millais. They moved to London, where John James became a partner in the firm of sherry importers, Domecq, Telford and Ruskin. More decisively than any previous writer, Ruskin brought 19th-century English painting and 19th-century English art criticism into sympathetic alignment. John Ruskin, (born February 8, 1819, London, England—died January 20, 1900, Coniston, Lancashire), English critic of art, architecture, and society who was a gifted painter, a distinctive prose stylist, and an important example of the Victorian Sage, or Prophet: a writer of polemical prose who seeks to cause widespread cultural and social change. They moved to London, where John James became a partner in the firm of sherry importers, Domecq, Telford and Ruskin. John James Ruskin was the son of an Edinburgh calico merchant. Cox, his mother, had a huge impact on the religious upbringing of John Ruskin. 58-60). Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article. In the process Ruskin introduced the newly wealthy commercial and professional classes of the English-speaking world to the possibility of enjoying and collecting art. One after another, Turner’s “truth of tone,” “truth of colour,” “truth of space,” “truth of skies,” “truth of earth,” “truth of water,” and “truth of vegetation” were minutely considered, in a laborious project that would not be completed until the appearance of the fifth and final volume of Modern Painters in 1860. Ruskin did this in a prose style peculiarly well adapted to the discussion of the visual arts in an era when there was limited reproductive illustration and no easy access to well-stocked public art galleries. John Ruskinwas born on February 8th, in 1819. Neoclassical critics had attacked the later work of Turner, with its proto-Impressionist concern for effects of light and atmosphere, for mimetic inaccuracy, and for a failure to represent the “general truth” that had been an essential criterion of painting in the age of Sir Joshua Reynolds. [4] Be on the lookout for your Britannica newsletter to get trusted stories delivered right to your inbox. Omissions? John Ruskin, an only child, was largely educated at home, where he was given a taste for art by his father’s collecting of contemporary watercolours and a minute and comprehensive knowledge of the Bible by his piously Protestant mother. Editor of. John James Ruskin, a typical Scot, of remarkable energy, probity and foresight, built up a great business, paid off his father's debts, formed near London a most hospitable and cultured home, where he maintained his taste for literature and art, and lived and died, as his son proudly wrote upon his tomb, "an entirely honest merchant." He wrote on subjects as varied as geology, architecture, myth, ornithology, … Turner, John Constable, and John Sell Cotman were at the peak of their careers. During the sixth year, he travelled to Europe with his parents. In 1818, he married his cousin Margaret, the daughter of a skipper in the herring fleet. More decisively than any previous writer, Ruskin brought 19th-century English painting and 19th-century English art criticism into sympathetic alignment. An only child, Ruskin was born in 1819 in south London to affluent parents, John James Ruskin, a Scottish wine merchant, and Margaret Ruskin, the daughter of a pub proprietor. But he had never encounteredanything so outlandish as this sudden devotion to the girls' school at Winnington. Updates? His father helped him to develop Romanticism. She taught him how to read the bible. Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article. He was born at 54 Hunter Street, London. It was these early experiences that ignited his lifelong love of nature. Articles from Britannica Encyclopedias for elementary and high school students. Instead, he defined painting as “a noble and expressive language, invaluable as the vehicle of thought, but by itself nothing.” What that language expressed, in Romantic landscape painting, was a Wordsworthian sense of a divine presence in Nature: a morally instructive natural theology in which God spoke through physical “types.” Conscious of the spiritual significance of the natural world, young painters should “go to Nature in all singleness of heart…having no other thoughts but how best to penetrate her meaning, and remember her instruction; rejecting nothing, selecting nothing, and scorning nothing.”. His father, John James Ruskin (1785–1864), was a sherry and wine importer, founding partner and de facto business manager of Ruskin, Telford and Domecq (see Allied Domecq). By 1843 avant-garde painters had been working in this new spirit for several decades, but criticism and public understanding had lagged behind. Despite his friendships with individual Aesthetes, Ruskin would remain the dominant spokesman for a morally and socially committed conception of art throughout his lifetime. As a child, Ruskin was reserved. In 1823 the Ruskin family moved to a semi-detached house with a large garden at 28 Herne Hill, Herne Hill. The young Ruskin spent his summers in the Scottish countryside and when he was four, the family moved to south London's Herne Hill, a rural area at the time. 1781), his wife, the daughter of a skipper in the herring fishery. John Ruskin was born in London in 1819, to his father, John James Ruskin, a keen Romanticist, and his mother, Margaret Ruskin, née Cock, an evangelical Christian. slip case also as new condition. Ring in the new year with a Britannica Membership, https://www.britannica.com/biography/John-Ruskin, Art Encyclopedia - Biography of John Ruskin, Ashmolean - The Elements of Drawing: John Ruskin’s Teaching Collection at Oxford, John Ruskin - Student Encyclopedia (Ages 11 and up). His father, a prosperous, self-made man who was a founding partner of Pedro Domecq sherries, collected art and encouraged his son's literary activities, while his mother, a devout evangelical Protestant, early dedicated her son to the service of God and devoutly wished him to beco Both had considerable influence on Ruskin, who would later go on to develop a wide range of interests and passions. Get a Britannica Premium subscription and gain access to exclusive content. He was the one who introduced him to Romanticism works of art. His father John James Ruskin was a friend of Mr and Mrs Gray and that acquaintance would eventually bring him into contact with the Grays’ eldest daughter, Euphemia. His first purpose was to insist on the “truth” of the depiction of Nature in Turner’s landscape paintings. John Ruskin, an only child, was largely educated at home, where he was given a taste for art by his father’s collecting of contemporary watercolours and a minute and comprehensive knowledge of the Bible by his piously Protestant mother. Please select which sections you would like to print: Corrections? Ruskin did this in a prose style peculiarly well adapted to the discussion of the visual arts in an era when there was limited reproductive illustration and no easy access to well-stocked public art galleries. Updates? Since most of them had been shaped by an austerely puritanical religious tradition, Ruskin knew that they would be suspicious of claims for painting that stressed its sensual or hedonic qualities. John Ruskin was born on 8 February 1819 at 54 Hunter Street, London, the only child of Margaret and John James Ruskin. This shift of concern from general to particular conceptions of truth was a key feature of Romantic thought, and Ruskin’s first major achievement was thus to bring the assumptions of Romanticism to the practice of art criticism. He wrote on subjects ranging from geology to architecture, myth to ornithology, literature to education, and botany to political economy. Ruskin was born on 8 February 1819 at 54 Hunter Street, Brunswick Square , London (demolished 1969), south of St Pancras railway station . Turner, John Constable, and John Sell Cotman were at the peak of their careers. His birthplace was in London in England. … 3 Alternately, John Ruskin’s mother, Margaret Ruskin, was not at all interested in the fine arts. John Ruskin was exposed to this from a very early age. Author. This combination of the religious intensity of the Evangelical Revival and the artistic excitement of English Romantic painting laid the foundations of Ruskin’s later views. This combination of the religious intensity of the Evangelical Revival and the artistic excitement of English Romantic painting laid the foundations of Ruskin’s later views. 1785), who was the son of a calico merchant in Edinburgh, and Margaret Cox (b. His father, John James Ruskin, was a Scots wine merchant who had moved to London and made a fortune in the sherry trade. In these circumstances the critic was obliged to create in words an effective sensory and emotional substitute for visual experience. By the mid-1830s he was publishing short pieces in both prose and verse in magazines, and in 1836 he was provoked into drafting a reply (unpublished) to an attack on Turner’s painting by the art critic of Blackwood’s Magazine. At the same time religious writers and preachers such as Charles Simeon, John Keble, Thomas Arnold, and John Henry Newman were establishing the spiritual and ethical preoccupations that would characterize the reign of Queen Victoria. He writes luminously about paintings and buildings with a power and passion unmatched by any other English author. Articles from Britannica Encyclopedias for elementary and high school students. After five years at the University of Oxford, during which he won the Newdigate Prize for poetry but was prevented by ill health from sitting for an honours degree, Ruskin returned, in 1842, to his abandoned project of defending and explaining the late work of Turner. Fellow and Tutor in English Literature, Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford. His father, John James Ruskin, was a Scots wine merchant who had moved to London and made a fortune in the sherry trade. Ruskin’s father was a sherry and wine importer, and as such, Ruskin spent a considerable amount of his childhood touring Europe with his father and these travels had a significant influence on his writings and poetry. John James Ruskin was a sherry merchant that through his work visited the great homes in Britain and subsequently saw the major collections of art. Working in the tradition of the Romantic poetic prose of Charles Lamb and Thomas De Quincey, though more immediately influenced by the descriptive writing of Sir Walter Scott, the rhetoric of the Bible, and the blank verse of William Wordsworth, Ruskin vividly evoked the effect on the human eye and sensibility both of Turner’s paintings and of the actual landscapes that Turner and other artists had sought to represent. John James had hoped to practice law, and was articled as a clerk in London. John Ruskin (8 February 1819 – 20 January 1900) Leading English art critic of the Victorian era, also an art patron, draughtsman, water-colourist, a prominent social thinker and philanthropist. In 1795, following his mothers receipt of a legacy, the young John James Ruskin was able to enter the Royal High School at Edinburgh, run by the rector Dr Alexander Adam (1741-1809) (see Viljoen Ruskin's Scottish Heritage pp. John Ruskin, (born February 8, 1819, London, England—died January 20, 1900, Coniston, Lancashire), English critic of art, architecture, and society who was a gifted painter, a distinctive prose stylist, and an important example of the Victorian Sage, or Prophet: a writer of polemical prose who seeks to cause widespread cultural and social change. The Ruskin Family Letters: The Correspondence of John James Ruskin, his Wife, and their Son, John, 1801-1843. Three years later, in the second volume of Modern Painters (1846), Ruskin would specifically distinguish this strenuously ethical or Theoretic conception of art from the Aesthetic, undidactic, or art-for-art’s-sake definition that would be its great rival in the second half of the 19th century. He is considered the leading English art critic of the Victorian era, also an art patron, draughtsman and watercolourist. His father, John James, gave his son that sense of duty and hard work that drove Ruskin around Europe on the many tours he took, the tours … Let us know if you have suggestions to improve this article (requires login). Neoclassical critics had attacked the later work of Turner, with its proto-Impressionist concern for effects of light and atmosphere, for mimetic inaccuracy, and for a failure to represent the “general truth” that had been an essential criterion of painting in the age of Sir Joshua Reynolds. Since most of them had been shaped by an austerely puritanical religious tradition, Ruskin knew that they would be suspicious of claims for painting that stressed its sensual or hedonic qualities. His first purpose was to insist on the “truth” of the depiction of Nature in Turner’s landscape paintings.